Skip to main content

About your Search

20110901
20110930
STATION
CSPAN 15
CSPAN2 10
MSNBC 4
MSNBCW 4
WRC (NBC) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WGN (CW) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 50
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)
west virginia, ohio, indiana, showers sneaking into kentucky and indiana. around here, it is a quiet morning with temperatures in the 40s in the mountains. 50s in the shenandoah valley to 55 in frederick. leesburg, 59. even some upper 50s down from andrews down 301 to la plata. in southern maryland and along the bay, temps in the low 60s. this afternoon, near 70 along the bay. easton around cambridge, 37. 73 expected here in washington. monika samtani, it is 4:25. how is the construction list? >> it is clearing. all around town. you'll see that if you're headed out to the beltway around tysons corner. a couple of things i want to tell you in case you're one of the early morning risers and heads north on 95 up toward baltimore. there is a disabled tractor trailer here in the fort mchenry. a car carrier there. it may be there for awhile. been there since about 4:00. let's head closer into town. all the way down here in virginia, swinks mill road is closed down between burrford and 193. lorton closed between furnace road and silver brook. route 123 is your alternate route. let's go arou
incorporate some students. our campaign 2012 bas it is visiting a high school in indiana, until the next 45 minutes we will hear from 15 students participating in the program. the high school is located in northwest indiana, and over 1000 students attend. thank you for preparing the students for the call in, and comcast cable for sponsoring the visit. our first student is jesse. >> how would you suggest to financially restore the united states postal service besides cutting back employment and benefits? guest: we think it is simple. there will be a slow, gradual change in the post office that needs to be done. we recognize there are people that will not use the post office and probably never use it again, but there is $65 billion of revenue by people that are utilizing the postal service. they should be done gradually. they should be done humanely, was consideration of the poor communities and rural areas, so they did not lose their service. that could be done by using these over-funding, the money ained.as been dreame that is the humane way of doing this. you have to remember, if you read
in india, versus getting your question answered by someone in indiana which might take one call to get answered, that neutralizes the overall costs because of the difference in the wage rates. we're encouraging the administration to consider how to incense u.them to bring thos jobs back. >> are they good jobs? >> terrific jobs. our business that grown 80% in the last the two years since when he the good fortune of participating in the jobs forum. we found families want to stay in local communities. people want to have the flexibility to be able to work from their home, or be able to work when they have the opportunity to, working around their family's schedules. >> this is an at-home call center? people working at home? >> absolutely. a young child or sick parents, they need flexibility. what this opportunity offers them is the ability to construct thiv other work schedules and work how offer and when they choose and choose the different companies they provide service for. so we have folks that will work 80 or 90 hours a week and can earn in the high $80,000 a year. it's very lucrative
including michigan and indiana. the chosen roles for the production will begin auditions on october 1st. a special roche hashana lesson today. they watched as a ram horne was being cured measured sawed it in drilled and polished. it is a semi musical horn used on yom kippur war. and they also got a chance to make their own. the king is back on the throne and no. 1 at the box office. you have seen the lion king before but not like this, the line can 3-d earned more than $29 million this weekend. hear some of the other box office winners. [ man ] did we get anything good? sweetie i think you need a little extra fiber in your diet. fiber makes me sad. oh common. i dare you to taste one hint of fiber in fiber one. oh, i'd be able to tell. why don't i just eat this bag? and how can you talk to me about fiber when you are eating a candybar. you enjoy that. i am. [ male announcer ] fiber beyond recognition. fiber one. introducing the new flip and fresh from air wick. it's something new to brighten your home. with 100% fragrance oil and two levels to choose from for when you need
to access that. host: indiana, you're on. caller: first, the chart you had at first seemed to add up to more than 100%. i was wondering how you reconcile that and how do you account for things like degradation like when the exxon valdez sank g.d.p. in aalaska went up because of the cost of recovery. host: thank you, john. guest: good catch. you must be an account yourself. what i left out of that chart is imports. they are counted as a negative in g.d.p., because they are not domestic production. and we measure it by final sales. with respect to your second question of degradation of the environment, that's an issue that's been kicking around citizens u.s. accounts were founded in the great depression in the 1930's, and yes, indeed, people recognize the founder of the, that that is a net deduction that should be taken against production, and just as we depreciate and use capital in production, we should do the same for natural resources. the difficult thing is how do weness economics of pollution? most oil wells are not bought or sold or developed by the companies themselves so, there's no p
with republican indiana governor mitch daniels sunday at 9:00 a.m. eastern. up next for viewers in the united states "fareed zakaria gps." >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a terrific show for you today. first up, a man who wears two very important hats, jeffrey immelt is president obama's job czar. in his day job he's the ceo of general electric. why in the world is oil about to be drilled right off america's coast without any american involvement? next up, the palestinian territory's quest for statehood. a roundtable of top experts looks at all of this and more. finally, one last look at an area where america's top dog status has been reaffirmed. >>> before i give you my take, a programming note. don't miss the cnn special tonight, "restoring the american dream getting back to work." top american leaders join me to talk about how to fix the unemployment crisis. that's at 8:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. >>> now my take. the european crisis you have been reading about in the newspapers is worth watc
reported in kol rado, indiana, nebraska, new mexico, oklahoma, montana and texas. the food & drug administration is trying to figure out the source of the contaminated fruit. genson farms is voluntarily recalling cantaloupe shipped to 17 states. i'm ainsley earhardt. back to greta. it off the plane safely. i'm ainsley earhardt. back to coretta. >> greta: senator marco rubio accuse the president of playing politics. we asked him about that and america's role in the world. nice to see you. giving a speech on america's role in the wore. how do you perceive it? >> it is an important world. we can't solve every problem in the world. there are few parts in the world that what is happening will impact us. the economic crisis in europe is having a direct impact here at home. in those places where we can make a differen we should try to if it is in our national interest. >> greta: we are sitting watching and hoping. >> there's not a lot we can do about europe per se based on soft decisions they made with regard to government spending. similar to the ones we made here. the conflict in libya
is the strictest in the nation, stricter than arizona, utah, indiana and georgia. is that a fair representation of it? >> it is. that is what the spots are called. they're proud of that. one of the key things that the judge did was again a departure from what courts have done in arizona law and others allowing law enforcement to make traffic stops and in the course of the stop other other contact, determine a person's immigration status, other courts said no. that is -- let's stop and take a look at that. she looks and said congress is allowed for states to have a role in immigration enforce many. she didn't block the law. she aloud it to go forward. alabama officials saying tonight the law goes into affect tomorrow. >> greta: there are other things. she didn't allow some things. some of the things she did allow, she allowed the part in the statute requiring schools to check citizenship of the students and also, one of the things i thought was unusual she upheld a section nullify contracts knowingly introduced to with unauthorized aliens which i thought is broader than any other decision i've s
beck against rex grossman of indiana. two men battling here in ority believes in the man who used to rock a mullet. mike shanahan owns the final vote and he's campaigning for neither qb. for now, we have a football filibuster. last night in the final preseason game against tampa bay, beck tried to lock down the job, grossman didn't even play. first play of the game, beck going deeper, anthonya armstron, well, just out of his reach. and later in the game, beck under pressure here, makes a good decision, good quick pass to the rookie. then at the end of the first half, beck under some heavy pressure here throws it up again but it's intercepted by d.j. johnson. beck only completed 10 of his 21 passes for 108 yards. beck finishes the preseason with two picks and one touchdown. grossman, two t.d.s, one pick. shanahan, though, not ready to name his guy. >> well, like i said, i'll get a chance to evaluate that over the next day and kind of give you a better assessment. it's hard to tell you right now because you can't see everything from the quarterback's perspective. so i get a chance t
of the committee, the gentleman from indiana, mr. rokita. mr. rokita: thank you and i thank the gentleman for yielding some time. i rise to give my strong support to this measure. this straightforward legislation before us today prohibits the national labor relations board from dictating what private businesses can and cannot locate jobs in america. mr. speaker, let me say that again. this straightforward legislation before us today prohibits the nlrb from dictating where private businesses can and cannot locate jobs in the united states. it's almost a bizarre situation that we're in. an american company wants to provide american jobs in america and we have an agency of this administration trying to prohibit that. because of recent overreach by the nlrb we unfortunately need to have this legislation, mr. speaker. businesses who want to hire americans in america ought to be able to do so. for americans wondering why jobs are going overseas, it's because there are too many regulations and too many bizarre regulations that are forcing companies out of this country. just so they can stay in b
will be a challenge for the president and colorado is a great example of a state he won last time like indiana, north carolina, virginia that is going to be a challenge. he's got to get young people energized, hispanics energized, independents. his numbers are way down in colorado. >> what happened? we had just heard 40 years ago that democrats were in the process of locking down colorado, new mexico, nevada. >> arizona? >> maybe even arizona. everything was breaking their way. the hispanic population growth out there. a lot of other things happening. but now just four years later what seemed inevitable? >> these are still purple states. they're not red states. but colorado is a state where the president's national problems are very well represented. the economy there is okay but it's -- there is still an overhang. again, hispanics, young people, he needs an energized base to turn out in a state like that and right now they are not a particularly energized group as compared to four years ago. >> you've got in all of those states competing things. one is that there is generally even among people who w
,000 bail each. sarah shourd was released last year. >>> a disturbing find in rural indiana. five people shot to death in their homes. investigators are releasing very little information at this point. they're not sure whether one person is responsible for the shootings or whether the suspect or suspects is among the dead. police originally responded to the scene for report of a toddler out in the street. they say that child led officers to the homes where they found the bodies. >>> it is now 5:34. happening today, we expect to learn how extensive the damage is to the washington monument. this afternoon the national park service will talk about what engineers found and how long repairs will take. the 550-foot structure has been closed to the public since last month's 5.8 magnitude earthquake. last year the park service planned to winterize the monument to prevent further damage during the colder months. >>> today prince william county officials and residents will meet to discuss the possibility of bringing metro rail to woodbridge. congressman jerry connelly has been pushing for a feasib
in the upper midwest, chicago to indiana. the notre dame game, they evacuated the stadium in south bend because of severe thunderstorms. that game might not get played today. there you see the location of the stadium. this is the first time in history they say that they've evacuated the stadium and delayed a game because of weather. also problems at the tennessee game, the iowa game, and the michigan game because of storms. >> i know -- >> they want them safe. >> i don't think they want to risk anything. i remember a story, a young student at notre dame, declan sullivan was his name. he was filming the practice and the hydraulic lift fell over, to his death. i would imagine that they're taking every precaution that they can. although some people may be upset with the decision. thank you very much, appreciate it. a lot going on with katia and lee. we'll check back, thanks. >>> also, we're covering gabrielle giffords. the last time we saw the congresswoman, she showed up for that important house vote to keep the government from defaulting. there she was getting a standing ovation. who could forge
to yield five minutes to my colleague from indiana, mr. stutzman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for five minutes. mr. stutzman: thank you, madam speaker, and i'd like to thank the gentleman from new york for yielding. on such an important subject that we're talking about today, i'd like to make a couple of points in reference to what the gentleman from massachusetts just made. in regarding the republican party. a i would say that the republican party dimake mistakes at the beginning of this decade. i would say the democrat part has made some mistakes in the last several years. i think there's plenty of blame to go around for both parties in washington. there's a new crew in town, thre's 87 new republicans that were elected last november from all across this country who have joined those in our party who are saying, stop the spending. stop the madness. we're working against ourselves, folks. madam speaker, i would say tha you know, we wouldn't have to continue having this discussion if we would stop spending, stop borrowing and then we would focus on th
cuyahoga creek as gotten worse. >> if indiana has to build a new bridge, where will the money come from? >> obviously, you can see from sky 11 the emergency workers are doing what they can after this collapse directly into the mississippi. >> clearly, we have significant, multi-trillion dollar issues when it comes to our infrastructure, matters of dire national importance, national security, national pride, and most importantly, national safety. meanwhile, we have millions of out of work americans and piles of soldiers we would all love to bring home from war. wouldn't it be nice to match the unemployed and returning soldiers to american infrastructure to solve a problem? isn't that what a job really is at the end of the day? and joining us now is barry lapatner, new york-based real estate lawyer, and a leader in the infrastructure construction business. most importantly, for our purposes today, he has authored a book, it's entitled "too big to fall: america's failing infrastructure and the way forward," and you basically argue, if you thought too big to fail was a risk, wait until you
and crannies of american history. >> on october the 21st, i see it the name wendell willkie, a man from indiana. a one worlder. what did that mean? >> he would not be a conservative republican today, would he? >> he was not a conservative republican back then. >> he was a corporate republican and he was engaged in a national debate -- we use the phrase class warfare now. class warfare now. republicans use it pejoratively when democrats talk, but that is what it was, class warfare. wendell willkie was born on a farm and roosevelt was born to a grand family, and they never saw the irony of what defended. >> what did he look like? >> what did he look like? >> he looked like a bear. he was a great big, larger than life, rumpled figure, who nevertheless had an aura, a charisma. one person famously said that his candidacy, which spun out of nowhere, a seemingly -- nowhere, a seemingly -- >> that he had never had a job. >> that he had never had a job. >> he was a jeffersonian democrat until the new deal. he said that his candidacy sprung from the grassroots of every country club in america. there has
in gary, indiana. there were not many american educated doctors who were where it -- who were willing to work in gary, indiana in the late 1970's. the economy was collapsing and it was a very poor and crime- ridden area. employer contributions, then and now, they are disproportionate for foreign doctors. u.s.-born doctors will not go there. different studies -- let me remarks briefly on immigration and economic growth. when it comes to high skilled immigration, there really is consensus among labor economists on the benefits of high skilled immigration could there probably is not with regard -- skilled immigration. there probably is not with regard to lower skilled immigration. in terms of fiscal effect coming terms of high skills contributed vs. what they use in public services, they actually pay off over their lifetime over $100,000 in net benefits to u.s. taxpayers in terms of what they contribute more vs. what they use up in services. on competitiveness, we first mentioned higher productivity. but there is another aspect, which is even more compelling. it is not just a one time ch
has done, great examples on the internet. indiana -- >> those are american companies. >> i've had obviously an iphone. i think apple, google, facebook wonders examples where it's like, you know, you're sort of lakers are competition? you're not even sure. [laughter] >> how is it that america is able to innovate so well given all the challenges we have great companies like that performing so well? >> in other words, the nation is a great innovator. how do you explain that? how does i continue to have been? >> it's kind of like a statement about democracy. you know, it's a bad system, but it's the least bad. well, the united states is the lease that encourage innovation. in silicon valley actually everything is particularly good at encourage innovation. the silicon valley orders of magnitude that is in any place in the world for creating new companies and fostering innovation is quite remarkable. so i don't think we actually need to worry about another country out there out innovativeness. i think like him a like him salinization in the world comes from america. it's true. a ridicul
market share indiana states will be a part with market share in other part of all. i also expecting more and more companies were dodging this worldwide. and i'd to believe that this will be a win-win-win situation for the u.s., for china, and also for worldwide economy. >> last word? >> i think that at national levels both governments will continue to do what they do now, which is managed each others' expectations and manage tension. i think it's important for china to increase transparency, particularly on security issues and to let its intentions be more transparently known. i think when it comes to business they will be intensified competition as china moves up the value chain. and that means they will be intensified friction. you would expect that. the trading relationship is very large now and it's going to be much larger 10 years from now. and i think that chinese and americans will continue to share one common feature, and that is being pragmatic, being extremely practical, and that will hopefully form a foundation for a strong underlying relationship as these tensions are managed
. at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to a member of the committee, the gentleman from indiana, mr. rokita. mr. rokita: thank you and i thank the gentleman for yielding some time. i rise to give my strong support to this measure. this straightforward legislation before us today prohibits the national lab relations board from dictating what private businesses can and cannot locate jobs in america. mr. speaker, let me say that again. this straightforward legislation before us today prohibits the nlrb from dictating where private businesses can and cannot locate jobs in the united states. it's almost a bizarre situation that we're in. an american company wants to provide american jobs in america and we have an agency of this administration trying to prohibit that. because of recent overreach by the nlrb we unfortunately need to have this legislation, mr. speaker. businesses who want to hire americans in america ought to be able to do so. for americans wondering why jobs are going overseas, it's because there are too many regulations and too many bizarre regulations that are forcing co
must love this. >> oh, yeah, they call me indiana jones. we have a good time. >> reporter: no, she has not retired. >> there's my.... >> reporter: and the hunting here is kind of special. >> yeah, i have my own honey, my own pineapple. my own brands of food and such. there's the gorgeous ocean. there's my garden. >> reporter: i thought you came to hawaii to mellow out. >> this is mellow. >> reporter: the 46-acre macadamia nut farm is the setting of her just ended reality show roseanne nuts. >> the solution to all the world's problems starts with my nuts. >> reporter: no longer doing battle with network tv executives, she spends much of her time fighting with wild boars. >> they're like people or something. they only want the stuff that isn't theirs. they're crazy. >> reporter: are they violent? >> yeah, they can be violent, yeah. they're as bad as a mad dog and they're tough. i mean they can kill your grand kids if they wanted or whatever. (bleating). >> reporter: also on the farm, goats. and one special sheep. >> that black one, that black sheep, that's roseanne barr. that's me. (blea
headlines. kill or killers still on the loose in indiana, police confirm they have no suspects in the gruesome murders of five people outside of indianapolis on sunday and for the first time, officers say it appears the killer is not among the dead. four of the victims are members of the same family, cops rushed to the murder scene after finding a 4-year-old girl wandering down the road. she was the only one to escape the crime scene. gretch? >> wow. he's one of the f.b.i.'s most wanted criminals so how does this ruthless mexican drug lord become the proud papa of two american kids? it's a story that's raising a lot of eyebrows this morning. his wife crossed freely into the united states and gave birth to twins at a hospital near los angeles. the reason -- she's an american citizen. so now she's headed back to mexico with two sons with american birth certificates. eric? >> a college student in new york facing criminal charges after taking the s.a.t.'s for high school students. he allegedly charged $2500 per student to take the exam. at least six of those high school students
or wherever, but you're dealing with people who might be in indiana or somewhere else in this country. how you deal with it? we're learning as we go. we have to increase our communications with the islamic communities in this country. some places, john, i think in your city, you have done quite an excellent job of the nypd developing contacts with the islamic communities in new york city. in mind state of indiana, we have islamic groups and i do not think we have done nearly as good a job as new york city has done, but smaller in scope. what this problem is very local. it means you have to have contact with the leaders of the islamic communities who are the people who can identify suspected radicals within their community. it is a problem that the federal government clearly has to deal with and be helpful on. but the real action is that the state and local levels to identify the people and try to head the mob. in chapter 12 of the commission's report is on the whole question of what to do about islam and the foreign policy measures which are largely ignored in their reporting on the report. bu
worse. this was a study done by columbia university and indiana university, i think. it is not totally getting worse, but it is in some places. i think that because people are learning, and we are telling them that it is like any other illness and it is a disorder of the brain, and then they are afraid of a brain disorder. so we are trying to decide on how to pitch a stigma, and the journalists educating people and writing balanced reports are very helpful in that, but i long for the day when everybody except mental illness as a disease like any other. whennk that's -- that somebody with a mental illness goes to the doctor, and they are diagnosed, that almost always leave without hope for a better life, and i believe that is changing a little bit. i think they have always been told they will have to live with it and maybe they can control it with medication or something, but i think that is beginning to change a little bit. now we know that recovery is possible. mental health treatment is beginning to be, instead of just controlling, moving toward the strength that people have and givi
, fort wayne, indiana, mobil, alabama -- mobile, alabama, rochester, new york, san jose, california, and south bend, indiana. section six would clarify would information the v.a. must provide to congress when seeking authorization for a midged me -- major medical project or facility project or lease. under current law, the v.a. is required to submit to congress a prospectus for all major medical facility projects and requests. it should include details relating to construction, equipment and other costs for the proposed project as well as any and all alternatives considered including operating costs. however, the v.a. has not provided this information in sufficient detail to allow congress to effectively evaluate proposed prompts and alternatives. without accurate and complete information, congress cannot carry out its statutory mission of ensuring an equitable distribution of medical facilities to provide access to care for our veterans across the united states or be assured we are good stewards of taxpayer dollars. to similarly improve oversight, section 7 of the bill would requir
votes of all the questions submitted to youtube. this comes from brandy and michael in spencer, indiana. >> growing concern among americans about size and scope of the federal government and infringement upon state and individual rights. >> if elected how do you plan to restore the federal government allow states to govern themselves? >> congressman what is your answer? >> obviously, it would take more than one individual. but the responsibility of the president would be to veto every single bill that violates the 10th amendment. that would be the solution. [ applause ] >> anything else? you have a little time left. [ laughing ] >> i'll tell you what, that is the subject that is crucial because government is too big in washington, d.c., we have no controls of spending, taxes, regulations no control in the federal reserve printing money. if we want government, whether it is medical care or whatever, it is proper to do it at the local level as well as our schools. there's no authority in the constitution to do so much what we're doing. there's no authority for them to run our schools. no
political history. he's one of the 14 men featured c-span's new series, contenders in terre haute indiana. friday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, watch some of our other videos that another special website for the series c-span.org/the contenders. >> translator: your xo answer is here with the presence of the general assembly. >> translator: presiding over the 65th session of the general assembly. all thanks also go to mr. ban ki-moon on his reelection as secretary general of the united nations. we express thanks and appreciation to him and the general has sense retired staff efforts over the past year, and in particular, his follow-up of the situation in our country. ladies and gentlemen, we wish to congratulate the people of the republic of south sudan on the exsession of that republic of the united nations. we wish also to congratulate the transitional counsel in libya for their counsel among us and the representation of the libyan people. my country has be witnessing this since last january, a key political crisis. the political opposition that has been one the plain establishments in yemen sin
of indiana, we have islamic groups, and i do not think we have done nearly as good a job as the york city has done, much smaller in scope. but this problem is very local. it means you have to have contact occasionally with the leaders of the islamic communities who are the people who can identify suspected radicals within their community. it is a problem the federal government clearly has to deal with it and be helpful on. but the real action, it seems to me, is at the state and local level to identify these people and try to head them off. you began your question with chapter 12 of the commission report, the whole question of what to do about islam and the foreign policy fischer's which are largely ignored in the reporting on the report. but that raises the question of how united states foreign policy must deal with the islamic world. it is a big question. >> how much is possible? it is like saying how do we prevent bank robberies. the insert is you do not prevent bank robberies. you solve bank robberies after the happened. the notion of trying to prevent attacks by radicalized americans or
's indiana, please go ahead. >> caller: thank you for your wonderful book. i was thinking of the relationship of ellen's three daughters. i read some of the first lady display that the figure of the second mrs. wilson wasn't worthy to be displayed next to the figure of her mother, ellen wilson. could you comment, please? >> yes. i don't know about that comment. i've never run across it so i don't know which daughter it was. edith had a somewhat contentious relationship with the youngest daughter from time to time. although at the end of her life they made up and were very cozy with each other. but ellen wilson had not wanted an inaugural ball. she didn't approve. she was a very sober, intellectual woman. she thought it was extravagant to have an inaugural ball. she thought it demedian the presidency to have a commercial event around it. so i don't think she had an inaugural gown. so she may have said that it was more important for her mother's gown to be there than edith's but i don't know which gown they would have used, frankly. >> when did edith wilson die? >> edith wilson died in 1961. sh
. illinois where i come from is not a swing state. but you look at winnable states like wisconsin, indiana, michigan, and especially ohio and pennsylvania. and you need a candidate -- >> rick perry's not going to win, though. >> you're going to need a candidate that's going to rock the suburbs in the industrial west. and that's a key value. >> you got one? >> yeah. >> i actually think romney is the de facto real front runner here. and we could have a late entry. there's a tremendous amount of chris christ christie-mentum if he gets in. i think people are looking at who is the anti-romney. what you described is happening. we go from trump to bauchman to perry. and this is really just a gauntlet that romney is running through before picking up the national -- >> and just sort of to reflect the lack of enthusiasm of romney that everybody's looking for something else. >> remember that four years ago, mccain right now was at 8 because it was anybody but mccain and then he made it. >> michael steele -- >> yeah. >> chime in. >> just a real quick question, i guess i want to ask the senator, but as
-grown misstate that china is an example of a country and also you have a lot of discussion at indiana, of countries that are engaged in the overconsumption, short-term political. >> guest: that's exactly right. 50 years of economic folly in stark choices ahead. america does have stark choices to make. and he needs to focus on making those choices so you can remain a preeminent economy. just as an analogy come as somebody said to me is sort of like the green bay packers. your number one. you win a super bowl. in order to stay there, focus on your own team dynamics. make sure it's the best it can be. if you start focusing on the guy snapping at your heels as number two, you can get overly focused and what they're doing in u.k. to the super bowl. i think that's a message for the united states. the problems we have right now, education, budget. china plays a role in tangentially, but it's not the core issue with respect to infrastructure. it is about what america is doing wrong. solve those problems in the remain competitive. if you don't involve province, china might even do some relativ
of georgia has, alabama has, utah has, indiana has. and in each of those cases, courts well, except for alabama, in those cases courts have enjoined the enforcement on the act of the doctrine of preemption. alabama has stayed its decision while it further studies the question but no court has upheld one of these statutes. the national association of state legislatures, the national state counsel legislatures say many states have major immigration legislation pending so there's an obvious need for guidance. the one caveat i would offer this involves a question of preemption? the issue is not racial profiling and a lot of public discussion centers on that but the issue on these cases is whether or not these laws are consistent with federal statutes. and the court might well think that congress is going to get around to addressing this issue and it's congress that ought to be providing the guidance. so with that caveat in mind that the court might decide to sort of sit back for a while and see if congress does anything, the other factors would seem overwhelmingly to indicate the court
from washington, indiana. caller: good morning. mr. kucinich, i wish i lived in a district where i could vote for you. i agree with almost everything you stand for and what you do. guest: thank you. caller: i will tell you, the fact that we don't have the pipeline for natural gas along our interstate systems, it burns me up. we and the united states has no energy policy. i do not know what we have been doing since the first arab embargo back in the 1970's. i sat in line for hours and we're still doing that. it is like nobody is home. i wish you had more ability to do things and get things straightened out. host: what can you do? guest: we need an american energy policy and we need to invest in the transition and our economy away from resources that would ruin the environment. decorates a cost on individuals in terms of their own personal health. the air that we breathe it gets polluted by certain energy sources. we need a new manufacturing policy. we need a new trade policy where we cancel -- we cancel all of our trade agreements. they are contingent on workers' rights, on cuban ri
, but the uprising of working women and men in wisconsin, indiana and ohio signals a rebirth of the great coalition that still provides our best hope for real and lasting change. i believe that we can adapt the great traditions that animated the union and civil rights movements in the 20th century to forge a vibrant, new spirit of militancy and a culture of organizing empowered by the latest communications technology. so let us link arms as brothers and sisters, united and determined to put an end to the war against workers and the unjust harassment of latino workers and their families. let's join forces with an unshakable spirit of solidarity for jobs and economic justice. let's reach out to one another and build a great multicultural coalition on a scale never before seen in this nation. let's serve notice that we're not going to be discouraged by political obstructionists. we are not going to be deterred by the citizens united decision, and we're not going to be turned around by any detractors. but with our faith in each other, with our shared vision of hope and opportunity and with our irrevers
with the islamic communities in new york city. in my state of indiana, we have islamic groups, and i do not think we have done nearly as good a job as the york city has done, much smaller in scope. but this problem is very local. it means you have to have contact occasionally with the leaders of the islamic communities who are the people who can identify suspected radicals within their community. it is a problem the federal government clearly has to deal with it and be helpful on. but the real action, it seems to me, is at the state and local level to identify these people and try to head them off. you began your question with chapter 12 of the commission report, the whole question of what to do about islam and the foreign policy fischer's which are largely ignored in the reporting on the report. but that raises the question of how united states foreign policy must deal with the islamic world. it is a big question. >> how much is possible? it is like saying how do we prevent bank robberies. the insert is you do not prevent bank robberies. you solve bank robberies after the happened. the notion of
starting at 8:00 eastern on sees the into. ? on c-span to. >> sarah palin it will be the speaker in indiana, beginning live nin set -- noon saturday. >> live sunday, ellis smith. >> ray lahood joined with business and labour representatives to discuss ideas for creating jobs for the nation's infrastructure. the meeting took place at southern mess of this university in dallas. i am honored to be here. we are holding what we call listening sessions on particular issues. the issue we're talking about today is infrastructure and its role in creating jobs and a competitive economy in the future. there is strong labor and business support for this. we have tom donahue and the chamber is a supporter it infrastructure spending. i would like to think about the support. economists disagree on a lot of thing, but there is overwhelming support to the view that spending on infrastructure is a very efficient way to create jobs. and it also creates an infrastructure base for the competitiveness thfor the econoy going forward. we welcome youoday and we are here to say something about what we're thinking ab
, including kentucky, new york, ohio, pennsylvania, west virginia, indiana, illinois and yes, even michigan. this has been made possible by no less than a modern industrial revolution. it has been known for decades that shale rock and many in the united ditzel's natural gas and sometimes form. weisbrod deposits of this rocking cover thousands of square miles, even entire states or multiple states. but until recently we didn't have technology to produce economically. then, in the 1990s, we started complaining to different innovations. one was hydraulic fracturing. this is the pumping of fluid down under pressure to create micro-fissures in the rock commit tpd for surface of the earth. these features are very tiny and we prop them open by and check sand with water. and then, that provides pathways for the gas to flow and ultimately produce. now, fracturing isn't something new. it was developed in the 1940s and has been used safely on a million wells over several decades. but in the case of shale rock, this still wasn't enough. another innovation require, this time a new one called horizontal
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)